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The Adventures of Elizabeth (El) Highe Reviews
Author: Bill Larkin 
Date: 1988
AGT


What does AIF stand for? Adult Interactive Fiction. If you likely to be offended by games with sexual content, you are advised not to open these files.


Reviewed by Graeme Cree (SPAG #5 -- April 19, 1995)


In THE ADVENTURES OF ELIZABETH (EL) HIGHE, you play Elizabeth Highe, a game designer for Sierra who must write a sequel to the hit, G-String Gertrude so that Ken and Roberta Williams will allow her to leave the building (all the names have been slightly changed, of course; i.e. Sierra to Appalachia, Roberta Williams to Robert Bills, etc.). You write your game by entering the computer (in a manner similar to the movie TRON) and physically retrieving it.

The AGT manual, in describing various uses for adventure games, suggests that you could write a game about your co-workers and  play it on a Friday afternoon. This seems to be exactly what Bill Larkins has done here (though I don't know if he ever worked for  Sierra). The game is short (I was able to complete it in 42 moves), simple and light-hearted.

The AGT parser is much maligned, but is really as good as the author makes it. It doesn't do much in this game, but it doesn't need to. The only problem I encountered was when I performed one important action and got no response at all, even though the action was registered. Some might mistakenly take this to mean that the action was not important and get sidetracked. The game is meant to be simple, cute, and quickly
over, and it is.
 


Reviewed by Carl Muckenhoupt

The title character is a programmer for Appalachia Networked, a painfully transparent Sierra Online parody. Your goal is to create the game that will ensure the company's financial future. Small and very simple - almost all the puzzles consist of giving items to people to make them stop blocking doorways. Unfortunately, if you don't have the necessary item, you can't leave the room - in other words, unpredictable death. Gives hints via the "help" command.

It's probably worth noting that the "100 MHz 80586" mentioned in the game would, at the time the game was written, have been considered ridiculously advanced (if it had actually existed then).

Rating: ***
 


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