Home About Me

DELRON

The Home of Otter Interactive Fiction

And the moral of this story is do not release a game too early...........

From the Adrift Forum October 2004

 

Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Where are my keys?
started by: Woodfish

Posted by Woodfish on Oct. 18 2004,9:12
What are people's opinions on this game?

I had doubts about it from the title alone, not being one for puzzlefests, and I couldn't imagine it turning out to be some beautifully-written masterpiece. From my experience, I was right. The opening title screen did look quite snazzy, and I like it that more and more people are putting effort into having good-lucking title screens instead of the default red title and straight into the introduction. From there, the introduction was simple yet did the job well enough, and the first room description looked okay.

As a rule, I thought the writing (of what I played of it) was average. There were no glaring mistakes, and it managed to portray the scene alright, although room descriptions often trailed off by going into a list of objects ("The room has the usual things a bachelors place has namely an uncomfortable settee, a battered old armchair, narrow screen television and what looks like a dvd player. "). But then possibly that's what others like, at least it groups the important items together. The author writes informally which I personally didn't like - one, because it makes the text seem unpolished and conversational, and two, because if it is the PC's narration, then it takes away the player's sense of fustration at not being able to find the keys, and trying to solve the puzzles around the house.

Interactivity, I thought, was a bit of a problem, and there were several missing items. I didn't play enough of it to spot many bugs, but there were several times that I thought "this would of been much better if he'd taken the time to do this". For example, there is a washing machine in the kitchen. The author has gone to the trouble of including responses for the handling of it but it would of been much better if it had some impact on the items of clothing you put in. As I said, a couple of items were missing, and some more interactivity would of helped. Something that struck me as being shabby was the way the author handled searching the settee. When you look at it, you get the description, then a little notice saying "You will be able to look under, look behind, look down side of the settee." For me, this is a definite-mimesis breaker, and seems kind of pointless. The player will read it and obviously try all three variations, get the objects, and that's it. It doesn't contribute anything to the game, and in fact takes away from it by actually giving you commands to type in.

Now I gave up playing this game very early on after exploring only a few rooms, as this an extremely un-intruiging beginning. You are presented with a task straight away, no lead-up to it, and you know what the game is going to consist of. For the average puzzle-loving player, this will be no big problem, but for most people, they like to be drawn into the game by something - or at least not presented with a title that pretty much rules out any chance of anything other than finding your keys happening.

I like it that the author decided to use conversation trees and ask about, even if the trees system did seem a bit flawed when talking to John in the first location and confusing for someone coming to grips with conversation trees. It also runs the risk of delivering repeated responses, which happened a couple of times, when the player asks the same question again to a character. But I can't say how the speech system impacts the whole game, because again, I didn't play it all - but in my eyes, conversation trees are always a good thing.

Going back to the title, and the importance of a title - if this were an IF comp entry (non-adrift because I'll try anything that's made with Adrift), and I saw it was called "Where are my keys?", I wouldn't bother giving it a go. The title is a very important aspect. It intruiges the audience into first playing it, and also continuing with it to see how it matches up with the title. For example, Sophie's Adventure is much more open-ended - the very fact that it just states "adventure" suggests that there is alot to that adventure, because it doesn't need to explain itself by detailing any of the plot. Photopia, as a title, won't make sense to the player right until the end, and is yet another point of intruige for the player, as it doesn't seem to fit in - Photopia is also an interesting title, as it sounds sorta magical. I'm just making the point that "Where are my keys?" is quite a bad title, and I'd never run down my game with anything as blunt and un-imaginative as that. But then again, maybe titles don't really matter and I just think too hard about these things. Plus, it is just a small "pocket-IF" so the player wouldn't be expecting really great things anyway.

I'm interested to hear a puzzle-lover's opinion of the game, because players like me are obviously not the intended audience of this game. Does anyone have any opinions on it? Good, bad? What were the achievements and failures of the writing style? Were the puzzles any good, and could you give me an example of a few?

(edit: talked about titles)



Posted by davidw on Oct. 18 2004,9:20
I quite liked it and I've been meaning to get a review written but I keep getting distracted with the IFComp games.

I thought the writing was adequate if a bit rushed in places. The puzzles were decent enough though some of them seemed a little overly complicated - example: digging in the garden to find the keys. There were more than a few items in the game that in theory could be used to dig with yet I wasn't able to use them for that purpose. And nor could I just dig with my hands (which in real life you could do unless the ground was rock solid).

The conversation menus were flawed. Repeat responses again and again never strike me as a good idea, but I suppose you have to draw the line somewhere where they're concerned. After all, you don't want to have to type fifty separate responses for a character in case the player decides to talk to that character fifty times. But a secondary response - "stop asking me the same question" or something along those lines - would have been nice.

I haven't played enough of the game to really comment further but I thought what bit I have played was okay. I preferred Ticket To Nowhere as that seemed a little more polished, not to mention it had some quality beta-testing performed on it :) :) :)



Nice to see a game-related thread for a change.

Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 18 2004,9:59
I have the game loaded into one of many open runners but have only played a small way.

So far, I really didn't like the opening layout. It looked unprofessional and put me off at once. You have to get the opening right. I get very fussy about lots of gaps in text or gaps that are 2 lines in one section and 3 in another. It's jarring and not clever. The writing strikes me as - it'll do - but I want to finish the game before posting a review.

Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 18 2004,10:05
Quote (Woodfish @ Oct. 18 2004,9:12)

Quote
As a rule, I thought the writing (of what I played of it) was average. There were no glaring mistakes, and it managed to portray the scene alright, although room descriptions often trailed off by going into a list of objects ("The room has the usual things a bachelors place has namely an uncomfortable settee, a battered old armchair, narrow screen television and what looks like a dvd player. ").

The problem, I see it, with games that have a modern setting is the need to include items that have no bearing on the game but bearing on creating a credible location. Which is why describing outdoor locations can be a mare (weather, traffic, people, noise, buildings, garbage etc etc) so you do tend to fall into the aboe way of describing (it just becomes a list of nouns).

Quote
Going back to the title, and the importance of a title - if this were an IF comp entry (non-adrift because I'll try anything that's made with Adrift), and I saw it was called "Where are my keys?", I wouldn't bother giving it a go. The title is a very important aspect. It intruiges the audience into first playing it, and also continuing with it to see how it matches up with the title.


This is so very, very true.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 18 2004,10:11
Is the title that important? I wouldn't have said so personally. An AIF author called Vachon often writes games with catchy titles - Pay Back, Unexpected Proposal - but the games themselves are dire.

Then again, I've deliberately chosen cool names for a few of my games - most notably Dead Reckoning and Shards of Memory - because I wanted them to stand out.

Posted by KFAdrift on Oct. 18 2004,10:25
I think the title cannot make a bad game good, but it can make a game more enticing to play.
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 18 2004,10:50
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 18 2004,10:11)
Is the title that important? I wouldn't have said so personally. An AIF author called Vachon often writes games with catchy titles - Pay Back, Unexpected Proposal - but the games themselves are dire.

Then again, I've deliberately chosen cool names for a few of my games - most notably Dead Reckoning and Shards of Memory - because I wanted them to stand out.

Titles are so important.

Take a handful of your favourite movies or books or games or whatever and think up the most cheesiest names for them instead of the ones they have.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 18 2004,10:52
Actually one of my favourite films is The Silence Of The Lambs which has got to rank as a truly awful film title.
Posted by KFAdrift on Oct. 18 2004,10:57
Not really, lambs as in lambs to the slaughter as in the victims. Quite a good title.
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 18 2004,11:07
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 18 2004,10:52)
Actually one of my favourite films is The Silence Of The Lambs which has got to rank as a truly awful film title.

I'll give you that one. That is truly an awful title for such a good film.
Posted by Eric on Oct. 18 2004,11:50
Well I spent part of an evening playing “Where Are My Keys” and quite enjoyed it but was, and sadly am, too idle to review it properly.  The game, as you’ll recall wasn’t billed as anything spectacular but calls itself a “pocket IF.” I appreciated the game. I need short games right now.  I’ve been avoiding the IF Comp since in the past I’ve played anywhere from ½ to all the entries and just don’t have that kind of time this year. I thought the disparaging remarks about the state of the house were funny and the place the key was hidden rather clever.  I only needed a few hints, which is good for me. I didn’t run into any game-stopping bugs or grotesque guess-the-verbs. Very nice little game all considered.
Posted by Mystery on Oct. 19 2004,12:15
I haven't finished playing it yet, so my comments are very limited and won't get into any specifics.

For a starter game it is above the average- and I'm very thankful it isn't a 'tour of my house' demo.  The descriptions were not too bad, but could use some polishing up and some could use a little rewording.

From what I have played so far, there are some issues with guess the verb and some of the hints are not much help at all, but nothing that would stop game play dead.  There were several instances where the sentences were mucked up.  Many places in need of the word 'your' instead had 'you' which makes for odd reading.

In short, I think the author could have improved this game a lot if he had it beta-tested.  Those instances of guess the verb could have been toned down and the repeated spelling problem would have been caught.  Though I haven't looked at the walkthrough, the process to bring it up mentions the wrong NPC's name.

I would definitely suggest exporting it as a data file, and doing a spell check- and you need to proof-read for stuff like 'you' & 'your' that are spelled correctly, just used in the wrong context.  And of course, get it beta tested.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,12:17
Quote
For a starter game it is above the average


It's not a starter game. It's his second.

Quote
Though I haven't looked at the walkthrough, the process to bring it up mentions the wrong NPC's name.


Is there a bug with the walkthrough? I looked at it when I got stuck (yep, I'm weak) and following what I was told to do didn't work. Or maybe I just did something wrong and it serves me right for cheating.

Posted by Mystery on Oct. 19 2004,3:53
First, second, or third- I consider it a starter game (ie. early work)

I didn't look at the walkthrough, so I couldn't tell you if it is buggy or not.  I can tell you that it tells you to ask John about it, but the response mentions Tom- who should have been passed out in the bath upstairs.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,6:34
Just fired it up and got this response not two minutes into it:

>ask john about walkthru

Tom looks at you in a pitying way...

The very first room description is full of grammar and punctuation errors.  Call me stingy but I just couldn't carry on with such blatant errors.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,6:41
Quote (gigabyteman @ Oct. 19 2004,6:34)
>ask john about walkthru

Tom looks at you in a pitying way...

To be honest, I never even realised the name was wrong until you pointed it out. :(
Posted by DuoDave on Oct. 19 2004,7:24
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 18 2004,5:52)
Actually one of my favourite films is The Silence Of The Lambs which has got to rank as a truly awful film title.

You do realize, don't you, that there was a book "Silence of the Lambs" before they made the movie? And in fact, "Silence of the Lambs" was a SEQUEL, but because of the immense popularity of the movie, they ended up making a movie of the first book as well, "Red Dragon". Which seemed to me kinda odd, since Anthony Hopkins aged 11 years in real life so they had to pretend he was younger.

Regardless, author Thomas Harris is responsible for what you call "An awful film title". It refers to a scene where FBI agent Clarice Starling recalls a barn fire she witnessed when she was a child, where all the animals in the burning barn were making horrible noises, and then there was silence. Quite horrifying, actually.

-d



Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,7:35
I know that, Duo. Awful book title, awful film title. They could still have changed it to make it a little catchier. After all, you wouldn't want to see a film called Do Androids Dream Of Electronic Sheep? now, would you?


Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,8:42
Definitely not, I can't seem to recall that film!
Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,8:50
I suspect you might be thinking of the film version of We Can Remember It For You Wholesale, another truly awful book title that was actually quite a good film.
Posted by DuoDave on Oct. 19 2004,8:56
Quote (Cannibal @ Oct. 19 2004,3:42)
Definitely not, I can't seem to recall that film!

I think he's referring to the steven spielburg movie "AI".

OK while we're on the topic, I think "The Six Million Dollar Man" would have been better had they retained the original book title "Cyborg". For one thing, it would have resisted inflation better. Six million dollars doesn't go very far these days.

Similarly, would a movie called "La Planète des Singes" have been as successful as "Planet of the Apes"? Pierre Boulle's book (translated to english), by the way, was better than the movie.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,9:01
Do Androids Dream Of Electronic Sheep? was actually made into the film Blade Runner. We Can Remember It For You Wholesale was made into Total Recall.

I don't know if AI was a book beforehand or not.

Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,9:02
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 19 2004,8:50)
I suspect you might be thinking of the film version of We Can Remember It For You Wholesale, another truly awful book title that was actually quite a good film.

Of course...
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,9:03
Is this thread going way way off-topic? Damn, who started a thread about an adventure game anyway...
Posted by DuoDave on Oct. 19 2004,9:07
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 19 2004,4:01)
Do Androids Dream Of Electronic Sheep? was actually made into the film Blade Runner. We Can Remember It For You Wholesale was made into Total Recall.

I don't know if AI was a book beforehand or not.

My bad. AI was based on the 1966 short story "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long" by Brian Aldiss.
Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,9:10
Quote (Cannibal @ Oct. 19 2004,9:03)
Is this thread going way way off-topic?

Of course not.

Hey, see the game last night?  :p

Posted by DuoDave on Oct. 19 2004,9:20
Quote (davidw @ Oct. 19 2004,4:10)
:03-->
Quote (Cannibal @ Oct. 19 2004,9:03)
Is this thread going way way off-topic?

Of course not.

Hey, see the game last night?  :p

No I watched the conclusion to the Farscape miniseries.
Posted by Woodfish on Oct. 19 2004,9:33
More importantly, who just saw the new Little Britain episode?

Do Androids Dream Of Electronic Sheep? is an exceedingly brilliant film, I seriously would pay good money to see a film with a title like that.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,9:49
OK...back ON TOPIC.

This game is truly dire.  I decided I would give it one more go.  This time, less than one minute in i get this:

>x jeans
You can see you second best going out jeans.

>x shirt
You can see you third best going out shirt.

Why would anybody continue playing this little gem based on the obvious state of untestedness?

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,9:51
I think calling it "dire" is a little harsh. Granted, it's got a lot of rough edges and could really do with some serious polishing, not to mention some hefty testing, but it's not a bad game all told.
Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,9:56
OK..not dire.  But considering that I can't muster the desire to move out of the first room I guess I will never know.
Posted by Woodfish on Oct. 19 2004,10:00
Quote
OK..not dire.  But considering that I can't muster the desire to move out of the first room I guess I will never know.


That's not a good explanation. In fact it's a valid reason for thinking the game is dire - it must be pretty bad if it can't even make you want to move out of the first room, don't you think? For a while, I thought "hmmm, this is boring, but it's obviously just me and my short intention spam that's the problem" - but now I realise its up to the author to grab the player and pull them in. If they don't, then it's their fault. And this game, for non die-hard adventurers (ie. non-davidw), didn't do that.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,10:07
OK...I'll stick with my first impression...the game is dire.  To be bombarded with strange responses to the most elemental commands right from the start only leads me to assume that the rest of the game must be filled with similar inconsistencies.
Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,10:13
Not every good game I've played has had a good start. The best game I've so far played in this year's IFComp actually has quite a boring start - the main character(s) - are stranded in the middle of nowhere and there's precious little to do. But once you make the effort and get on with the game, it's pretty damn brilliant.

While Where Are My Keys? doesn't have a great introduction, I don't think it's especially bad either. I didn't read it and automatically reach for the delete key.



Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,10:21
Does seem a tad critical when you're only highlighing a couple of mistakes.

However, you're perfectly entitled to your opinion.

In a way, I think RO should be happy that his game is getting discussion. Most fall by the wayside.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,10:23
That's the first thing I thought. When was the last time we actually had a proper game discussion on here?
Posted by KFAdrift on Oct. 19 2004,10:24
Yes, there is at least discussion, and people playing the game. The intro is certainly unusual, but I don't think it really works right. The number of minor errors does seem to point to a requirement for proper testing. I think Richard seems to have fallen into the trap of a final quick launch, instead of another weeks testing.
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,10:24
I don't remember the last time. I've only been here 2 years!
Posted by KFAdrift on Oct. 19 2004,10:26
Yep, this is a great example of what the forum is for. Of course, more games launched gives more opportunity for discussion.
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 19 2004,10:31
Quote (KFAdrift @ Oct. 19 2004,10:24)
I think Richard seems to have fallen into the trap of a final quick launch, instead of another weeks testing.

Maybe the lack of new games prompted him to rush this one out.

It lacks the polish of his first game. I also think it highlights the need to put aside a game for a week or so once you have finished and then give it a play through to pick up on the bits and pieces you missed or don't like.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,10:36
While I realize am just pointing out a couple of mistakes, I just feel that it shows a lack of testing and proof reading.  My opinion doesn't really amount to a hill of beans.  All I am saying is it puts me off looking into the rest of the game when the first couple of commands that I tried resulted in glaring errors.  What do I know?  Davidw plays and reviews mor egames than anyone I know so he probably knows what he is talking about.

*** It is not that the intro is boring.  I actually like the premise of the game.  It is the confusuion created through poor grammar and misidentified characters that is bothering me.



Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,10:56
I think it's down to the individual how they actually judge whether a game is worth continuing with or not. I always try and persevere with a game unless something incredibly bad strikes me about right at the start as I know that even the games that aren't much good have probably had a lot of effort expended on them. And it's not like we have so many new Adrift games popping up on a daily basis that we don't have time to play them all.

Then again, the intro is potentially the most important part of the game as it's the first thing the player sees and they're not very likely to continue with the game if it's depressingly bad.

Or not most times anyway. I have to admit when I read the intro to Death Agency:

Quote
Helo, u are agent 007 u mision is to kill zombis if u are shot 3 tims u is ded


That struck me as so mind-numbingly awful I just had to read on to see if it was a joke game or something. Unfortunately it wasn't. It was just mind-numbingly awful.

Posted by Woodfish on Oct. 19 2004,11:02
I am being 100% truthful when I say that the first line of my first ever released game was:

Quote

hello this is my fist game ever and its relly good. u r an adventerer and u decide 2 go on a quest and get da cristal of power from the dragun of doom! i hope u like it! oh yeah u hav a strang way of seein so u can not look at da objects in dis game!


No joke.

Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,11:08
I remember reading that and assuming, quite rightly as it happened, that it was a joke intro. I wonder how many people saw that and just gave up in disgust?
Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,11:09
Given the fact that you are only 16 years old and your first ever game was probablyquite a while ago I would say you could be excused for such simplicity.  I have played your ADRIFT games and am quite impressed at your writing skills.  You have obviously made a lot of improvement.

*** I would expect more from a 42 year old who has at least one other game to his credit and who reads this forum all the time and KNOWS that simple things like spelling and grammar errors would be a source of frustration for regular text adventure gamers.



Posted by Woodfish on Oct. 19 2004,11:11
Lol, I hope they did because it was a pretty crap game. But going back to titles - I called that game "The Game To End All Games" which I realise now was equally as bad as the game, but at least it offered some intruige and ambigiouity (instead of being called, "da well good kwest" or something).
Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,11:29
Quote (gigabyteman @ Oct. 19 2004,11:09)
I would expect more from a 42 year old

Is it right to expect more from people because they are over a certain age? I wouldn't have said the age of the game writer is an issue and if a game is bad, it's bad whether the writer is old, young or a bit in between.
Posted by Eric on Oct. 19 2004,11:32
Quote (gigabyteman @ Oct. 19 2004,6:09)
*** I would expect more from a 42 year old who has at least one other game to his credit and who reads this forum all the time and KNOWS that simple things like spelling and grammar errors would be a source of frustration for regular text adventure gamers.

And why should we all care what you expect? Some of us are just doing this for fun, you know. There's no obligation to play these games. If a game doesn't interest me right off I just go on to something else.  The criticism of this game has been entirely too harsh IMHO.  Why, I wonder?
Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,11:34
Well...my view is this:  If you are writing interactive fiction you consider yourself a writer.  Someone 42 years old would presumably have more education, or at least experience, than someone who is 16 years old.  While I agree with your interpretation in principle, I hold to my view that age generally brings experience.
Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,11:36
I dont give a #### if you (or anybody else) care what I expect...a thread was started and i put in my two cents worth.  If you disagree then fine...crappy attitude though.

***It has nothing to do with the game not interesting me.  It has to do with obvious errors, right from the start, that detracted from my gaming experience.  You have your opinion, I have mine.



Posted by davidw on Oct. 19 2004,11:42
Quote (gigabyteman @ Oct. 19 2004,11:34)
Someone 42 years old would presumably have more education, or at least experience, than someone who is 16 years old.

That's not necessarily true. When I was 16 (back in the distant days of yore before the joys of working life fell upon me like a tonne of bricks), I played lots of text adventures. I also wrote them on either the Spectrum or the Commodore and read quite a few articles on the idea of writing them. I'd have said that at age I probably knew as much about playing and writing the games (aside from the technical aspects of coding) as anyone was likely to know. I doubt someone 26 years older than me would have known much more and most of them, no doubt working and with a partner and kids to boot, would probably have known a good deal less.

In any case, for the most part it's impossible to know the age of whoever is writing a game. They might be just into their teens or they might be just into their eighties. It's the game that's the important factor. And while I admit that the idea of kids writing games (as was probably the case with Jin and the much-maligned Death Agency) fills me with a kind of dread, there's no reason to assume they're not just as capable of writing a decent game as us old-timers.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 19 2004,11:48
I am talking about spelling and grammar mistakes here people.  Someone older and presumably out of school should know more about spelling and grammar than someone presumably still in school.  Actually, scrap the whole argument.  Regardless of age, if you are writing text adventures you consider yourself a writer.  And a writer should know (at any age) how to spell and proofread.
Posted by Eric on Oct. 20 2004,2:05
First, sorry...I don’t want to be stepping on any toes.  I just thought the game was being treated a bit too harshly for what it was intended to be. As far as age goes, any 16 year old today probably knows more about programming than someone like me who graduated with a liberal arts degree before the PC existed.

True enough, stuff should be spell checked and proof read but, for my part, I admittedly am not good about those things, especially when I’m playing around with games, which is bad since I’m a lousy speller, can’t type by touch, and know zilch about grammer. Perhaps discussions like this will shame me into paying more attention.

One thing to remember is that writing, editing and copyediting are all different functions and someone can be a good writer and lousy at editing or copyediting. Of course, with a text adventure, the author has to handle all those functions along with the programming, so it is quite a challenge.

Posted by gigabyteman on Oct. 20 2004,2:47
Anybody can use a spellchecker...that is the beautiful thing about it.  Nobody should have as many spelling mistakes in their game as this one has.  I just went back and played a bit and my opinion of it just gets worse.  I ended up under the stairs and am told there is a hole in the floorboards - but i can't examine it, or look through it, or anything.  In fact, according to the game it doesn't exist except for in the room description.  There is also a fuse box with a switch that I cannot manipulate for the life of me.  Some people are saying that the game is being judged too harshly.  All I'm saying is that the game was released to the public and is open for scrutiny.  It wasn't released for a comp or anything so there was no rush to release it.  Yet it is full of holes (from what I can see anyways) and poor spelling and grammar.  I wouldn't release something like this, obviously untested, and expect that nobody would pick up on these things.  I remember a game Mystery wrote and she got shellacked for a number of minor inconsistencies.  Her game was for a mini-comp so in my mind she can be excused because she didn't realistically have time to have it tested and whatnot.  This game is different and so I expect more from it.  Others can have their own expectations and I can have my own.  And for me, this simply doesn't measure up.  There really can be no excuse for releasing the game in its current state.  It may well be a good game.  Hopefully version 2.0 will come along soon.  As I said before, I *like* the premise of the game.  I just couldn't continue playing it the way it is now.

***RO - I really am not bashing your game.  I'm just saying it could have used a little more time.  Especially considering there was no real rush to get it out to the public just yet.

Gigs

Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 20 2004,6:21
The problem this forum has had for some considerable time is healthy debate regarding a new game. Too many flame wars and boring off topic threads. RO might think he and his game are being hung, drawn and quartered but his game is receiving more discussion than most. Suggestions are being made.
Posted by Cannibal on Oct. 20 2004,6:23
Quote (Eric @ Oct. 19 2004,11:32)
:09-->
Quote (gigabyteman @ Oct. 19 2004,6:09)
*** I would expect more from a 42 year old who has at least one other game to his credit and who reads this forum all the time and KNOWS that simple things like spelling and grammar errors would be a source of frustration for regular text adventure gamers.

And why should we all care what you expect? Some of us are just doing this for fun, you know. There's no obligation to play these games. If a game doesn't interest me right off I just go on to something else.  The criticism of this game has been entirely too harsh IMHO.  Why, I wonder?

Calm down!

There is nothing sinister in the discussion of this game.

If you write an adventure - for yourself, for fun, for the crowd, whatever - and release it into the public domain then you invite public comment.

IMO I find spelling and grammar very frustrating. In this day and age of spell checkers it's pretty unacceptable. Simply export the game and run it through MS Word.

Ouch!!!!!!!!

 

Any donation would be much appreciated to help keep the site online and growing.
To help make your donation quicker and easier just click the "Donate" button and you
will be taken to the secure Paypal donation page.
    Home  |  About Me